We want people to better understand the disorder, which was formerly known as multiple personality disorder.

Dissociative identity disorder (DID) — previously known as multiple personality disorder — is an often misunderstood dissociative disorder that causes people to behave and feel as if they have more than one "identity."

Dissociative identity disorder (DID) — previously known as multiple personality disorder — is an often misunderstood dissociative disorder that causes people to behave and feel as if they have more than one "identity."

According to the American Psychiatric Association, DID symptoms include trouble with memory, emotion, perception, sense of self, and behavior — and can potentially disrupt every area of mental functioning.

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The National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that around 2% of the population experiences some type of dissociative disorder.

The National Alliance on Mental Illness reports that around 2% of the population experiences some type of dissociative disorder.

People of all ages, races, and socioeconomic backgrounds can experience a dissociative disorder, a category in the DSM-5 that also includes depersonalization disorder and dissociative identity disorder. However, those who experience sexual and physical abuse during their childhood are at an increased risk of DID.

Jenny Chang / Via buzzfeed.com

If you are living with DID, we want to know what you wish people understood about it.

If you are living with DID, we want to know what you wish people understood about it.

instagram.com / Via Instagram: @mentalhealthquotess

Like that media representations really miss the mark on what the disorder is actually like.

Like that media representations really miss the mark on what the disorder is actually like.

Not everyone with DID has to have a violent identity.

Universal Pictures / Via tenor.com


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