Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama declared states of emergency ahead of the storm, which made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River Saturday night. Nate is already responsible for the deaths of at least 21 people in Central America.

Nate gathers strength over the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to be a Category 2 when it makes landfall in the US

Nate gathers strength over the Gulf of Mexico and is expected to be a Category 2 when it makes landfall in the US

Hurricane Nate on October 7, 2017.

NASA

Hurricane Nate expected to bring life-threatening flooding across the Gulf Coast, from Louisiana to Florida

Hurricane Nate expected to bring life-threatening flooding across the Gulf Coast, from Louisiana to Florida

/ AP

Hurricane Nate makes second landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi

Hurricane Nate makes second landfall near Biloxi, Mississippi

Twitter

Hurricane Nate arrives in New Orleans

Hurricane Nate arrives in New Orleans

National Hurricane Center

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu lifted a mandatory curfew after the National Weather Service canceled a hurricane warning in the city.

Hurricane Nate made landfall in Louisiana Saturday evening as a Category 1 with winds up to 85 mph, a bit weaker than earlier forecasts expected.

The city, however, is still asking residents to shelter in place as the hurricane passes over the state.

"There is still a serious threat of storm surge for areas outside of levee protection and residents should continue to monitor local news and take precautions," the statement read.

Salvador Hernandez

Hurricane Nate made its second landfall in the United States near Biloxi, Mississippi, early Sunday morning as a Category 1 system, marking the first time that a hurricane has hit the state directly since 2005's Hurricane Katrina.

Nate's eye is moving north at 20 miles per hour, with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph. The storm is now expected move inland across Mississippi and other parts of the Deep South and the Tennessee Valley through Monday, according to the latest update from the National Hurricane Center.

Forecasts show Nate weakening quickly as it crosses land, and predict that it will likely be downgraded to a Tropical Storm sometime Sunday.

Along the Gulf Coast, conditions deteriorated rapidly overnight Saturday as Nate made its second approach. By midnight, thousands of energy customers in Alabama and Mississippi were without power, and social media posts showed major flooding and heavy winds battering cities like Gulfport, Mississippi, and Biloxi.

Hurricane Nate eye is headed toward the Mississippi coast, and officials warn the storm could bring life-threatening storm surge flooding to Gulf Coast states, including Louisiana to Florida.

Nate made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi River earlier Saturday night, and is expected to move northeast.

Flooding along Mississippi's coast is expected to reach somewhere from 7 to 11 feet, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Hurricane Nate made landfall in Louisiana as a Category 1 hurricane, the National Hurricane Center announced, just 10 miles southwest of the mouth of the Mississippi River.

Winds of up to 85 mph were blowing as Nate made landfall, moving north at about 20 mph, the center announced.

A hurricane warning remained in effect from Grand Isle, Louisiana, to the Alabama and Florida borders. In New Orleans, officials have issued a tropical storm warning.

Nate is expected to pass over Mississippi, Alabama and Tennessee sometime before Sunday night.

Salvador Hernandez

The outer bands of Hurricane Nate, which is projected to be a category two hurricane when it makes landfall on Saturday night, are already hitting New Orleans, with wind gusts up to 45 mph.

The National Weather Service warned in a tweet that "conditions will deteriorate quickly this afternoon."

The National Hurricane Center said on Saturday morning said Nate "is a little stronger over the central Gulf of Mexico."

The storm is traveling at a quick 22 mph and is not expected to slow down, and is now expected to be a Category 2 hurricane when it makes landfall in the US.

—Gavon Laessig

A hurricane watch remains from Grand Isle, Louisiana, to the Alabama/Florida border, and includes metropolitan New Orleans. Photos and videos by Louisiana locals show the grey clouds of the first hurricane band.

The storm is expected to bring about three to six inches of rain to most places, but some areas may see as much as 10 inches of rain.

As it crosses inland, Hurricane Nate is still a fast storm, moving at about 20 mph, officials said. That will likely bring tropical-force winds across the southeastern portion of the US, the center said. Some areas as far north as Tennessee may see enough rain for flash flood warnings.

Tropical storm watches have been issued for southeastern Mississippi, most of Alabama, and western Georgia. On Saturday night, President Donald Trump approved a disaster declaration for Mississippi, freeing up federal relief funding for the state as the storm starts to batter the coast.

—Salvador Hernandez

The most serious damage from Nate is expected to come from the storm surges, which is predicted to be as high as 7 to 11 feet along the Alabama-Mississippi border. Flood warnings are in effect for much of the Gulf Coast.

On Alabama's Dauphin Island, local officials reported Saturday night that roads in low-lying areas were already inundated with more than four feet of water.

At 1 P.M. CT, the eye of Nate was 105 miles "south of the mouth of the Mississippi River," tweeted the National Weather Service for New Orleans.

The latest report from the National Hurricane Center notes that "the center of Nate will approach the mouth of the Mississippi during the next several hours and will make landfall along the central U.S. Gulf Coast tonight."

It also warns that storm surges between the mouth of the Mississippi and the Mississippi/Alabama border could reach up to 11 feet, and up to nine feet between the Mississippi/Alabama border and the Alabama/Florida border.

"The deepest water will occur along the immediate coast near and to the east of the landfall location, where the surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves," warned the NHC.

State officials in Mississippi, Alabama, and Louisiana spent much of Saturday warning residents in evacuation areas to leave their homes.

"This is the worst hurricane that has impacted Mississippi since Hurricane Katrina," Mississippi Emergency Management Director Lee Smithson said Saturday. "Everyone needs to understand that, that this is a significantly dangerous situation."

More than 40 percent of oil- and gas-drilling platforms in the Gulf of Mexico were also evacuated, according to the US Department of the Interior, shutting about 70 percent of oil production and 53 percent of natural gas production. The region accounts for about one-fifth of US oil production.

—Grace Wyler

The mayor of New Orleans announced a 7 P.M. curfew for the city of New Orleans, as a safety precaution. Shelters have opened across the gulf coast region for people to ride out the storm in a safe location.

— Amber Jamieson


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