We have to care for everyone, and sometimes that means the person who got stabbed, and the person who did the stabbing.

To write this post BuzzFeed Health spoke with one EMT and two paramedics based in Honolulu, Hawai'i, and a paramedic based in New York City. And btw, although all paramedics are EMTs, not all EMTs are paramedics; which we explain in detail below.

It's not often that you make it out of work without someone's bodily fluids on your uniform.

It's not often that you make it out of work without someone's bodily fluids on your uniform.

Blood, poop, pee, vomit. The uniform doesn't usually make it through a shift unscathed.

Universal Pictures / Via gifsgallery.com

We only turn on our sirens when we're transporting someone with a life-threatening emergency.

We only turn on our sirens when we're transporting someone with a life-threatening emergency.

We turn on our lights and sirens based on the urgency of the call to 911 and the information we're given from the dispatcher. If we get to the scene and it’s not a life threatening emergency, we turn our lights/sirens off for the ride back to the hospital. That’s why you'll sometimes see people in the back of an ambulance without the lights or sirens on.

giaportfolio.com

We have to care for everyone — whether it's the person who's hurt, the person who caused the injury, or both.

We have to care for everyone — whether it's the person who's hurt, the person who caused the injury, or both.

As EMTs, it's our responsibility to help everyone in an emergency situation.

Hxdbzxy / Getty Images


View Entire List ›

SHARE
Previous articleHere's Why Fact-Checker Snopes.com Launched A $500,000 Crowdfunder
Next article18 Beauty Products That'll Basically Save Your Summer